My Little Subclass: Inheritance is Magic

April 29, 2017

New post on my blog.

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Twisted Tutorial Webinar

April 19, 2017

Glyph and I are giving a tutorial about Twisted and web services at PyCon. In order to try it out, we are giving a webinar. Please come, learn, and let us know if you like it!


PYTHONPATH Considered Harmful

April 13, 2017

Another post on my new blog.


Shipping Python Applications in Docker

March 20, 2017

Posted on my new blog as an experiment!


On Raising Exceptions in Python

December 10, 2016

There is a lot of Python code in the wild which does something like:

raise SomeException("Could not fraz the buzz:"
                    "{} is less than {}".format(foo, quux)

This is, in general, a bad idea. Exceptions are not program panics. While they sometimes do terminate the program, or the execution thread with a traceback, they are different in that they can be caught. The code that catches the exception will sometimes have a way to recover: for example, maybe it’s not that important for the application to fraz the buzz if foo is 0. In that case, the code would look like:

try:
    some_function()
except SomeException as e:
    if ???

Oh, right. We do not have direct access to foo. If we formatted better, using repr, at least we could tell the difference between 0 and “0”: but we still would have to start parsing the representation out of the string.

Because of this, in general, it is better to raise exceptions like this:

raise SomeException("Could not fraz the buzz: foo is too small", foo, quux)

This way exception handling has a lot of power: it can introspect foo, introspect quux and introspect the string. If by some reason the exception class is raised and we want to verify the reason, checking string equality, while not ideal, is still better than trying to match string parts or regular expression matching.

When the exception is presented to the user interface, in that case, it will not look as nice. Exceptions, in general, should reach the UI only in extreme circumstances: and in those cases, having something that has as much information is useful for root cause analysis.


Moshe’z Messaging Preferences

December 8, 2016

The assumption here is that you have my phone number. If you don’t have my phone number, and you think that’s an oversight on my part, please send me an e-mail at zadka.moshe@gmail.com and ask for it. If you don’t have my phone number because I don’t know you, I am usually pretty responsive on e-mail.

In order of preference:


Don’t Mock the UNIX Filesystem

December 2, 2016

When writing unit tests, it is good to call functions with “mocks” or “fakes” — objects with equivalent interface but a simple, “fake” implementation. For example, instead of a real socket object, something that has recv() but returns “hello” the first time, and an empty string the second time. This is great! Instead of testing the vagaries of the other side of a socket connection, you can focus on testing your code — and force your code to handle corner cases, like recv() returning partial messages, that happen rarely on the same host (but not so rarely in more complex network environments).

There is one OS interface which it is wise not to mock — the venerable UNIX file system. Mocking the file system is the classic case of low-ROI effort:

  • It is easy to isolate: if functions get a parameter of “which directory to work inside”, tests can use a per-suite temporary directory. Directories are cheap to create and destroy.
  • It is reliable: the file system rarely fails — and if it does, your code is likely to get weird crashes anyway.
  • The surface area is enormous: open(), but also os.open, os.mkdir, os.rename, os.mknod, os.rename, shutil.copytree and others, plus modules calling out to C functions which call out to C’s fopen().

The first two items decrease the Return, since mocking the file system does not make the tests easier to write or the test run more reproducible, while the last one increases the Investment.

Do not mock the file system, or it will mock you back.